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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 12, 2019 10:00am-10:30am GMT

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this is bbc news, i'm rebecca jones. the headlines at ten: prison sentences of under six months could be scrapped in england and wales for all but violent and sexual offences, under plans being considered by the ministry ofjustice. president trump digs his heels in over his mexican border wall as the us government shutdown enters a record—breaking 22nd day. hundreds of thousands of workers have not been paid. we can work really hard to get this education and make sure we can provide for ourfamily education and make sure we can provide for our family but still end up provide for our family but still end up wondering if we are going to be able to pay our bills. europe braces itself as heavy snow continues to fall bringing chaos to a number of alpine regions. austria suffers the worst conditions for 30 years. major tech companies showcase their freshest innovations at the ces expo in las vegas. and coming up on the travel show at 10:30 — tony giles explores israel. prison sentences of less than six
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months could be abolished under plans being considered by the ministry ofjustice. it's argued that community penalties are better than shortjail sentences at cutting re—offending rates. in england and wales, it's thought the move would mean about 30,000 offenders avoiding jail every year, including burglars and shoplifters. this report from ben ando. at any one time, around 3,500 people are behind bars in england and wales, serving sentences of six months or less for crimes like burglary or shoplifting. but almost two thirds of those released will re—offend within a year.
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the prisons minister rory stewart has described these short sentences in a newspaper interview as long enough to damage you and not long enough to heal you, adding that those jailed even for a few weeks can lose their home, theirjob and their family and be set on a course to more crime. the ministry ofjustice says that prison is meant to protect the public from dangerous people, reduce crime, and also reform prisoners. but could it be our overcrowded jails are instead turning one—time offenders into career criminals? since the 1990s, the prison population has doubled from 40,000 to 80,000. in 2017, 86,275 people were jailed and more than half of them received sentences of six months or less. abandoning such short prison sentences in england and wales is stilljust a proposal. legislation would be needed and politicians know promising to send fewer law—breakers to prison
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is rarely a vote winner. but a similar scheme in scotland has beenjudged a success and is being extended to sentences of 12 months. it could be that ending short sentences will benefit criminals, and the community, in the long term. ben ando, bbc news. let's get more on this now from peter dawson, who heads the prison reform trust charity and is a former prison governor. what are your views on the new proposals? it isa it is a good proposal, and it is a good proposal because it follows the evidence, and the evidence is exactly what you have just presented. if you are interested in cutting future crime, you will do much better to use a community punishment than a short sentence of imprisonment. there are good reasons for that which people will understand. as takes your home, your
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job, it carries an extra stigma which make that much less likely that you will settle down in the future. this is just that you will settle down in the future. this isjust a that you will settle down in the future. this is just a sensible way to do is the public‘s money. as it happens, it will also reduce the pressure of some of the most difficult prisons which deal with this very high level of short—term prisoners. which you hear about in the news, these prisons being disgraceful. some people will say this is soft justice. every punishment has that level of punishment, and can take a number of different forms. the point about its military penalty is it can include other things. it can include making good the damage that people have done through committee work. they can include treatment for
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addiction and help for mental health conditions. we know that when that happens the reducing rate of reoffending is better. there are some circumstances where a custodial sentence would be appropriate. yes, the scottish model introduces a presumption, the starting point that you do not use prison, it does not removejudicial you do not use prison, it does not remove judicial discretion. you do not use prison, it does not removejudicial discretion. i do not think the ministries suggesting that. people should not be way that those who commit serious, sexual and violent crimes are not going to prison. in fact they are going to present much longer than they used in at the start of the century. sentence rates have rocketed up and thatis sentence rates have rocketed up and that is why our prisons was so cool. but i given that it reduces the reoffending and overcrowding, if it is so obvious, why has no government
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of mr paul? it is a very politically inconvenient fact, and the debate about imprisonment is often not based on those facts. most people who commit crime do not get punished by going to prison. if they did b would have a staggering number of people in prison in this country. 0ne people in prison in this country. one third of the adult male population in this country had been convicted of an offence for which they could in theory have gone to prison. most of our punishment takes place in the trinity. this isjust an extension of an existing practice. kathryn is with me now. we heard from the prison reform trust, clearly very much in favour of this proposal. there will be many people who are alarmed by it. yes, and we are hearing that peter's due
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is replicated from differentjustice campaign groups and senior figures in the justice system who think this isa in the justice system who think this is a sensible way to go, but of course there will be those who say that this is a form of giving soft on crime. it is a difficult sell to the public, particularly those that may have experienced things like burglary, there is no such thing as a victimless crime. looking around on social media, there are certainly those views around. people are worried that when you take away the prospect of prison when you actually ta ke prospect of prison when you actually take away that deterrent, and whether it is low—level crime or not it is still crying. there is no official response from the opposition as yet, but we do know that labour was my point of view has been that it is notjust about using methods like this, it is about putting more money into this system to build more prisons and employ more staff, when thejustice secretary told last year about scrapping five new women's prisons and replacing them with rehabilitation units, there was
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welcome from people like peter but also labour said there were murmurings about how much of that was purely about saving money and whether and not a great way to effectively manage to put those rehabilitation centres into place, whether they would have enough cash. rory stewart has said he is willing to ta ke rory stewart has said he is willing to take on all of that backlash from public and his own party because he believes it is a debate he needs to win. the standoff between president trump and members of the us congress over funding for a wall on the mexican border, has now resulted in a record—breaking government shutdown. the row has entered its 22nd day, leaving hundreds of thousands of government workers unpaid as politicians argue over budget. david willis has the latest from washington. at the white house, they prayed. among them, a president caught in a crisis so seemingly intractable, it might take divine intervention to solve. a government shutdown that started
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with museums closed and rubbish piling up in national parks has now seen hundreds of thousands of government workers go without pay. and following protests across the country, that shutdown has now set a dubious record as the longest in american political history. cheyne was among those watching. when she and her family moved to the farming community of nokesville in virginia, she was looking forward to life as a stay—at—home mother to her young twins. but her husband works for the government and has not been paid, leaving her to fret about how to make ends meet. it's just a time that is so unbelievable, that you can work really hard to get this education and be sure that we can provide for a family still, and end up wandering if we are going to be able to pay our bills, wondering if we are going to be able to send our kids to preschool,
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wondering, you know, how we are going to, just how we are going to get by. president trump had threatened to declare a national emergency in order to break a political stalemate. he still might, he says, but not now. this is a 15—minute meeting — if they cannot do it, i will declare a national emergency. there has been no formal contact between president trump and democrat leaders since talks collapsed in the middle of this week. and with none planned, washington's winter of discontent threatens to drag on and on. around a quarter of the government agencies are out of operation until a budget is agreed, leaving 800,000 employees unpaid. one of those is sunny blaylock, who earlier spoke to us from her home in virginia. the federal government is shot down right now, so i am a federal government contract, so i am not working, iam not government contract, so i am not working, i am not going to get back pay like a lot of people think. i am just out. i am out of work. my
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husband is a federal government employee, so he is working without pat’- employee, so he is working without pay. it is incredibly frustrating, andi pay. it is incredibly frustrating, and i know it must seem confusing, and i know it must seem confusing, and we feel confused that this is going on. a lot of people do not realise... they think it will all be 0k realise... they think it will all be ok because we will get back pay, which i think should be happening for the federal government employees, but federal contract as well not be getting back pay. a lot of people are really getting hurt. there is the secondary source of the economy, like the people that support the federal employees in this area, i live outside washington, dc, said that as a good chunk of the economy, said the dog walkers, restaurants, shops. it is hurting everyone. we are all being affected. there is this unknown, we do not know how long it will go. i have really loved the work that i
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did. i have it like go back eventually. i do not know how long it will be. i do not know if i need to start making other plans. my husband is working without pay, said you had to evaluate your family circumstances and how long you can hold out. you have to start using your emergency savings for normal living, so you do not go out to eat, you do not make plans for any trips will stop you do not buy the kids extra things. we had observed summer camp well in advance in this town. things like that, we just are not making any plans, the hunkering down and holding out. —— we are hunkering down. the transport secretary, chris grayling, has warned the uk could see a rise in political extremism if mps block the prime minister's brexit deal. in an interview with the daily mail,
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mr grayling said the 17 million people who voted for the uk to leave the eu would feel ‘cheated' by any attempt to water down or stop theresa may's deal. meanwhile, thousands of people are expected to march through central london today, demanding a general election. with me is the conservative vice chair for london, paul scully. let's pick up on what the transport secretary has been writing in the mail. he predicts that could be a surge infar mail. he predicts that could be a surge in far right extremism if brexit is blocked. you can see the frustration in people, geraci egypt this week in halep and a supreme and other people had been attacked verbally and intimidated as they have been going about their business. i think people will feel cheated if brexit just business. i think people will feel cheated if brexitjust does not happen or starts to be questioned, because people have had their views quite clear, and now it is up to us
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to get on and make it happen. ugbo did leave, what in your view of the charges are theresa may getting hurt deal through? i am charges are theresa may getting hurt dealthrough? i am supportive charges are theresa may getting hurt deal through? i am supportive of the deal through? i am supportive of the deal because it does do, it gets us to leave the eu in an orderly fashion. the numbers are challenging undoubtedly, but we have seen movement, evenjust undoubtedly, but we have seen movement, even just yesterday had a labourmp movement, even just yesterday had a labour mp saying he is very sleazy considering voting for the deal, jim fitzpatrick. george freeman who previously voiced against the deal now saying he was aborted. previously voiced against the deal now saying he was abortedm previously voiced against the deal now saying he was aborted. it could be closer than some people predicted? it might be, but the numbers are challenging. let's assume as is being assumed that theresa may does not win on tuesday, for thy heart options? should the government perhaps has brexit?” don't think that is a realistic thing, because if you stop is bowling, unless you are taught about a week or two to get something through, then we can look at it, but if the just postponing it entered
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the long grass, people will feel cheated and that is why this deal is the best way of getting to the next age and starting negotiating our future relationship. i reported by those who are bored of brexit, we are only halfway through the process. what about another referendum? what i have seen so far with people with people who propose that are the people and want to pretend the original referendum did not happen. if you have one person who says, i voted to leave and i still want to, let's just take it with the public, they never take that more seriously. everyone is pushing that simply does was to reverse the 2016 referendum. there is this march in central london today, people calling for a general election. might that actually be the answer? that is one of the big problems, the stumbling blocks, jeremy corbyn has been calling for a general election. he could write out a deal at hand it to us and we put it back to her magical about against
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it back to her magical about against it because he just wants a general election. it is just about politics for him. the other parties want to pretend the referendum did not happen, only the conservatives are debating this than the interest of the country. that intransigence is causing a lot of the blockage in parliament. to the frustration of people out in the country. and we shall see, a very interesting week ahead. the headlines on bbc news: new proposals to scrap sentences of six months or less are being considered to reduce the pressure on prisons, as ministers argue shortjail terms are less effective at cutting re—offending than community penalties. president trump digs his heels in over his mexican border wall as the us government shutdown enters a record—breaking 22nd day. hundreds of thousands of workers have not been paid. europe braces itself as heavy snow continues to fall bringing chaos to a number of alpine regions. and austria suffers the worst conditions for 30 years. and austria suffers the worst conditions for 30 years. sport, and time for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre.
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for mail and the jermaine jenas for mail and thejermainejenas has called the leeds united to post about it after head coach admitted he was behind the spying incident at derby's training ground. frank lampard derby's training ground. frank lampa rd described derby's training ground. frank lampard described it as unethical. even though no rules were broken and there was nobody arrested. lee's windpipe point clear after beating lampard's side or the pitch, all eyes on bills are. no laws broken and the argentine says it was his decision. he has worked in other countries where it is common practice. jack harrison scored the goals of out of 311,000. it was the spying mission that grabbed the headlines. for him to have had an employee somme and he put up to the
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job actually physically caught by the police and to stand there in front of cameras and say he doesn't care, it is disgusting. it will be interesting to see what the deal is with that, it is out of order. in tennis, andy murray has been back on court after all the emotion surrounding his impending retirement. he had a knock up today on court at melbourne with dimitrov as he warms up for his opening opening match on monday morning. it could be his final match because the pain in his hip that he has been talking about, although if monty goes well he could get onto hope of bowing out at wimbledon. a shocker for me because we are the same age, same generation, and it is kind of sad to see him going through what he has been going through any last couple of years with these injuries. as someone who has been through a major energy with my elbow in the
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last couple of years, i can definitely empathise. —— major injury. probably to the extent of his injury is worse than mine. injury. probably to the extent of his injury is worse than minem seems like he had not a very long career because today players are playing along but he is 31, ten years ago he... we will say that he had a great and very long career, but that is a real thing. all the best for him. we will miss them. todayis best for him. we will miss them. today is him, tomorrow another one. we are not 20 any more, our generation, everyone is more than 30, the kind of things happen. who will step into murray was like shoes? cameron norrie has been doing his best in the country where he grew up. he made his first atp final in new zealand, and although he lost overnight to tennys sandgren, his
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progress and all the juicy and rise outside the world's top 50. bragging rights to either the head of the six nations weekend after munster took a step was the quarterfinals with a 41-15 step was the quarterfinals with a 111—15 win at gloucester. mustard fly— half 111—15 win at gloucester. mustard fly—halfjoey 111—15 win at gloucester. mustard fly—half joey carbery scored 111—15 win at gloucester. mustard fly—halfjoey carbery scored 26 poysden outshine the returning danny cipriani on the other side. tries from rory scannell and andrew conway, the result ends gloucester up conway, the result ends gloucester up as my chances of qualifying. ireland play in the big time. australia had beaten india in the first one—day international in sydney, the hosts reached finishing 288-5 sydney, the hosts reached finishing 288—5 from their 50 overs. peter handscomb top scored for children with 73. half—century sport usman khawaja and shaun marsh. that is all the sport for now, you
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can find out more on all those toys on the bbc sport website. —— more on all those stories. heavy snow is continuing to wreak havoc across large parts of europe, leaving roads blocked, trains halted and schools shut. seven people have died in austria in the past week, and two hikers are missing. conditions are also particularly treacherous in bavaria, as andy beatt reports. from scandinavia to switzerland, and the baltic to bulgaria, vast swathes of europe in the grip of a deadly, debilitating freeze. in austria, the heaviest snowfalls in 30 years have left alpine resorts and villages stranded, up to three metres of snow bringing many to a standstill. in germany, hundreds of soldiers
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joined emergency workers to clear roofs and roads in bavarian towns. five districts declared a state of emergency with schools closed and many communities cut off. further north in saxony, helicopters were used to blow snow of trees to stop them falling on roads and railways. but some remain blocked, while more than 100 flights have been cancelled. three people were injured when an avalanche swept through this hotel in eastern switzerland. local reports said the wall of snow was 300m wide. and storms across scandinavia have made some routes impassable. in northern norway, a bus full of students blew off the road, while winds on the swedish border approached almost 180km/h. 1,000 miles further south, more snow and sub—zero temperatures. drivers in romania battling blizzard conditions, police rescuing some, but reportedly finding the body
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of one man in a car park. translation: you cannot see three metres in front of you. right here, 200m back, you cannot see. translation: we're waiting, for the moment. we're waiting for the snowfall to stop. but there is little sign of that with heavy snows forecast to continue across europe over the weekend. for many, there is still a long winter ahead. andy beatt, bbc news. several people have been injured after an explosion at a bakery in central paris. police suspect the blast was caused by a gas leak which was reported in the building this morning. a number of cars and shops have been damaged by the blast in the city's ninth district. firefighters are trying to contain a fire burning at street level. a saudi woman who fled her family and became stranded at bangkok's main airport is due to arrive in canada after being granted asylum there. 18—year—old rahaf mohammed al-qunun was stopped in thailand
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while attempting to reach australia from kuwait. she said she feared being killed by relatives if she returned home, as she had publicly renounced islam. the un's refugee agency has said it considers her to be a legitimate refugee. police in wisconsin have charged a 21—year—old man with kidnapping a teenage girl and murdering her parents. jake patterson was arrested on two counts of first—degree homicide and one count of kidnapping. 13—year—old jayme closs had been held captive since october, after her mother and father were shot dead. she managed to escape and was found yesterday. jane 0'brien has been following the story. jaime does it does appear that her parents were shot dead in western wisconsin. at a briefing, please describe thousands of volunteers who suddenly appeared on thursday almost a month later and approached a woman
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for help. this lady went to a nearby house and notified that neighbour of the claim, and this neighbour called 911 and my deputies responded en masse immediately, and identified jayme as the person that approached the neighbour. they took control of her, possession of her and put her in safekeeping, and a short time later one of my patrol sergeants happened to find a vehicle that matched the description that jayme gave my deputies of the suspect, and pulled the vehicle over and took the suspect in custody at that time. the suspect directed and is currently being held in barrett county jail.
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that suspect is jake thomas patterson. he is 21 years old from wisconsin. he is currently being held on 2 degrees of first—degree homicide for the murder ofjayme's parents and one count of kidnapping. police say that the suspect and the previous contact with the family but that jayme was the target of the attack. ——had no previous. they believe she was held near the town of gordon about an hour from her home they said patterson went to considerable effort to avoid detection. the investigation attracted national attention, and a reward of $50,000 was offered for information. local officers say they never give up hope of finding jayme alive. the big tech companies lavish huge amounts of money on their gigantic stands at the international tech expo, the consumer electronics show. it's a chance to pitch their latest wares to electronic retailers and show off their freshest innovations.
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as the show closes in las vegas, our correspondent dave lee took a tour of some of the biggest displays. this is a demo to show off a new audio system, but what is capturing peoples attention is the windscreen is covered with his image like a big screen. the way they are doing that is by using a projector strapped to the ceiling, but it is one idea of what we might be able to do in a car if it was become self driving. but we have here? new lg styler, no need for plumbing, you do is the
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water, generate the scheme back here, so... green and if that dropping the records out? the scheme comes up dropping the records out? the scheme comes up and allows the wrinkles to be released, so steam penetrates on the inside out, opening the dummett and the scheme and shaking makes everything go away. how many times have you had to explain why this is shaking? waited many. you have the patience of a saint. —— shaking? waited many. you have the patience of a saint. -- way too many. a cute robot from samsun, because the retailer bought at his desire to intelligently never its way around location such as a restaurant. it can bring food one year the plate has heart and may even suggest a desert. who needs a human to do that? we have found the sony stand.
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0ne that? we have found the sony stand. one of the trends we have found his video equipment being sold specifically for bigger bloggers are bloggers. it is big business or copies like sony because many of those bloggers i'd using equipment thatis those bloggers i'd using equipment that is more expensive than big broadcasters like the bbc. that is it for ces 2019 but not over for tech this year. this will be a huge year and we're just getting started. and you can read and watch all dave and the rest of the bbc tech team's reports from the event at bbc.co.uk? /ce52019 we all know the frustration of getting stuck behind slow—moving traffic when you're driving — but this was one jam where the drivers didn't dare
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hoot their horns no matter how impatient they got. this was the scene in south africa's kruger national park as four large male lions strolled along the road — apparently oblivious to the hold—up they were causing behind them. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt taylor. hello. a mild and increasingly windy weekend across most parts of the uk. the damp weather across southern pa rt the damp weather across southern part of england and wales eases away this afternoon. brighter in the channel islands and the second part of the day. sunshine in eastern ireland and scotland. rain most persistent across the highlands and islands in scotland this

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